Dennesha Frazer, Master Teacher & Lead Teacher of the Social Enterprise Club at Holland High School.
Dennesha Frazer, Master Teacher & Lead Teacher of the Social Enterprise Club at Holland High School. ©

British Council

The Social Enterprise in Secondary Schools Ambassador Campaign continues with another feature from Holland High School. Meet Dennesha Frazer, Lead Teacher for the Social Enterprise Club, who shares some insight on the programme. 

Q: 

What do you love most about the British Council’s Social Enterprise in Secondary School Programme?

 A:

The programme allows the youth to experience the joys of entrepreneurship, as well as the hard work required to sustain a business. The programme also encourages students to become more aware of and sensitive to the needs of others. There is also the opportunity for students to recognise that entrepreneurship is a viable way to make an income.

 Q:

 Why would you recommend that other students become a part of the Social Enterprise Programme at your school?

 A:

I would encourage students to join the Social Enterprise club because this allows them to explore their creativity in a way that will be beneficial both economically and academically. The social aspect of the programme will also be very good for their emotional health and well-being because helping those in need is truly fulfilling.

 Q:

 What do you think are some of the benefits of being a social entrepreneur?

 A:

Being a social entrepreneur will help you to feel fulfilled, as more social needs are being provided for. It will see the entrepreneur gaining more support as people are more apt to support businesses which are so flavoured. This will also benefit the community in which the entrepreneur operates as well since solving social problems means impacting lives positively. 

Naioka Williams, Head Girl at Holland High School, and Head Boy Mario Wray share how their school's social enterprise club came up with the ingenious idea to recycle newspapers to create placemats.
Naioka Williams, Head Girl at Holland High School, and Head Boy Mario Wray share how their school's social enterprise club came up with the ingenious idea to recycle newspapers to create placemats. ©

British Council

Mario Wray, Head Boy at Holland High School, showcases the placemats their club developed from recycled newspapers as part of their social enterprise.
Mario Wray, Head Boy at Holland High School, showcases the placemats their club developed from recycled newspapers as part of their social enterprise. ©

British Council

A feature on the Seed-Funding Handover Event published by YouthLink magazine.
A feature on the Seed-Funding Handover Event published by YouthLink magazine.  ©

British Council

Q:

How can we better support students to become more entrepreneurial?

A:

Students need to consistently be exposed to the successes of entrepreneurship. This is an old career path that has created many successful individuals. If students are taught the rudiments of entrepreneurship and are consistently encouraged through several avenues to be creative and innovative from an early age, then this will change their lives.

Q:

How has being involved in this programme impacted your professional/personal development?

A:

Teaching Entrepreneurship has cultivated my passion for this field. A programme of this nature gives me a chance to see my students apply the same principles taught in class. One only has to see the level of maturity and responsibility that an entrepreneurial student takes on to recognise that the programme is ideal for their development.

Q:

What motivates you to continue in this programme?

A:

I have watched my students grow daily, being more and more involved in the programme. My colleagues are also very enthusiastic, and the team spirit is amazing.

See also